fakespacegirl:

Hate doesn’t breed hate. Hate inspires anger in victims of hatred and that anger is called hatred to delegitimize it and villainize people. If you wanna help people who are victims then first you gotta stop acting like they’re just as bad their oppressors and abusers.

(Source: vitalthaumaturgy, via tiefstenrot)

Tags: activism

euthanizeallwhitepeople:

shijinkoo:

espritfollet:

numinous-queer:

officialmcmahon:

fuckyeahethnicwomen:

espritfollet:

This is a map of Asia. North Americans, you may notice this map is not solely comprised of Japan, Korea, China and Thailand. People in the UK, you may notice India is not  a continent. That is, if those of you who generalize entire continents can even pinpoint India on a map. Indians are Asian, gasp! And not all brown skinned people are Indian, also, gasp! There are an alarming amount of people, of all ages, from all backgrounds, who seem to be unable to process this.
I’m ethnically Asian. Since Asia is an extremely large continent, I could be from any number of countries. I am neither from India, China, Korea, Japan or Pakistan, yet not so surprisingly, I am still Asian. 
Yes, there are commonalities across regions, through the conflation of cultures, colonialism, globalization, transnationalism and movement of diasporas. Sometimes these are all the same thing. Rickshaws, rice and curry can be found across the continent. But let’s not overgeneralize. You can also find Buddhists, Catholics, Muslims and Hindus across Asia. Cantonese Speaking Chinese Muslims! English Speaking Indian Jews! 
No, we are not all the same. Orientalism? (Please look up Edward Said for basic concepts) No thank you. 
Geography, people. It’s important. 

This pops up on my dash every so often. I reblog it again, not just because I wrote it, but because nothing has changed since I first posted this.

What’s cool about Iran is that it falls in 3 different regions of Asia so depending on what part of Iran you’re in, you can kind of get culture shocked a bit. The central and western part of the country is West Asia, the north east is Central Asia, and the southeast is in South Asia. 


To the folks wondering about Russia being included, I want to mention that the cultural debates and angst about that has been going on for CENTURIES. While France has been pretty fetishized all the way back from Peter the Great, there is no question that we are not Europe, even with that influence showing really obviously in historical seats of power like St. Petersburg. Nonetheless, the whole country was under control of the Mongols (The Golden Horde) from roughly 1242 to 1480, and that left an enormous Mongolian and Tatar heritage that remains to this day. The ancient Scythians are huge in the cultural imagination as well. And besides… look at the Russians who are outside the standard “Kievan Rus” phenotype (which most folks assume is how all Russians look.) 
Here are three of the 30 distinct ethnic groups in Siberia alone:

Buryat grandfather, photo by Alexander Newby

Evenk children, photo by Evgenia Arbugaeva

Young Yakut couple, photographer unknown

boom

AS SOMEONE WITH NORTHERN IRANIAN (AZERBAIJANI)/RUSSIAN/ HAZARA-PERSIAN/ UYGHUR-CHINESE ANCESTRY THIS IS SUCH A BEAUTIFUL POST 

IF ANYONE EVER SAYS “I LOVE ASIAN CULTURE”, REFER THEM TO THIS AND THEN STOMP ON THEIR FACE

euthanizeallwhitepeople:

shijinkoo:

espritfollet:

numinous-queer:

officialmcmahon:

fuckyeahethnicwomen:

espritfollet:

This is a map of Asia. North Americans, you may notice this map is not solely comprised of Japan, Korea, China and Thailand. People in the UK, you may notice India is not  a continent. That is, if those of you who generalize entire continents can even pinpoint India on a map. Indians are Asian, gasp! And not all brown skinned people are Indian, also, gasp! There are an alarming amount of people, of all ages, from all backgrounds, who seem to be unable to process this.

I’m ethnically Asian. Since Asia is an extremely large continent, I could be from any number of countries. I am neither from India, China, Korea, Japan or Pakistan, yet not so surprisingly, I am still Asian. 

Yes, there are commonalities across regions, through the conflation of cultures, colonialism, globalization, transnationalism and movement of diasporas. Sometimes these are all the same thing. Rickshaws, rice and curry can be found across the continent. But let’s not overgeneralize. You can also find Buddhists, Catholics, Muslims and Hindus across Asia. Cantonese Speaking Chinese Muslims! English Speaking Indian Jews! 

No, we are not all the same. Orientalism? (Please look up Edward Said for basic concepts) No thank you. 

Geography, people. It’s important. 

This pops up on my dash every so often. I reblog it again, not just because I wrote it, but because nothing has changed since I first posted this.

What’s cool about Iran is that it falls in 3 different regions of Asia so depending on what part of Iran you’re in, you can kind of get culture shocked a bit. The central and western part of the country is West Asia, the north east is Central Asia, and the southeast is in South Asia. 

image

To the folks wondering about Russia being included, I want to mention that the cultural debates and angst about that has been going on for CENTURIES. While France has been pretty fetishized all the way back from Peter the Great, there is no question that we are not Europe, even with that influence showing really obviously in historical seats of power like St. Petersburg. Nonetheless, the whole country was under control of the Mongols (The Golden Horde) from roughly 1242 to 1480, and that left an enormous Mongolian and Tatar heritage that remains to this day. The ancient Scythians are huge in the cultural imagination as well. And besides… look at the Russians who are outside the standard “Kievan Rus” phenotype (which most folks assume is how all Russians look.) 

Here are three of the 30 distinct ethnic groups in Siberia alone:

image

Buryat grandfather, photo by Alexander Newby

image

Evenk children, photo by Evgenia Arbugaeva

image

Young Yakut couple, photographer unknown

boom

AS SOMEONE WITH NORTHERN IRANIAN (AZERBAIJANI)/RUSSIAN/ HAZARA-PERSIAN/ UYGHUR-CHINESE ANCESTRY THIS IS SUCH A BEAUTIFUL POST 

IF ANYONE EVER SAYS “I LOVE ASIAN CULTURE”, REFER THEM TO THIS AND THEN STOMP ON THEIR FACE

(via lokabarn)

austinkleon:


The Bechdel Test
Alison Bechdel’s original 1985 Dykes To Watch Out For strip that became known as “The Bechdel Test.”

austinkleon:

The Bechdel Test

Alison Bechdel’s original 1985 Dykes To Watch Out For strip that became known as “The Bechdel Test.”

(via yodelmachine)

lagos2bahia:

So many men have internalized the lie that they have uncontrollable sex drives, and no way to control their anger. They aren’t ashamed of their abusive behavior because they see it as a something natural to them and maybe even central to their masculinity. It’s scary as hell.

(via tiefstenrot)

(Source: -teesa-, via coffees-and-cats)

pop-culture-mulcher:

Gamergate is a real shit show, a movement that likes to threaten violence and then laugh at the people who get scared, populated primarily with men who have an axe to grind with the concept of women in general. It’s a movement seemingly populated with people who hated being bullied on the playground, learned nothing from it, and now are thrilled to have some small amount of power to bully other people.

As a woman who games a lot and is involved in several gaming communities, gamergate is hard to ignore. Places where I spend my time have become garbage dumps because of the antagonistic gamergaters who all want to see Anita Sarkeesian dead but don’t have the gumption to pull the trigger themselves (which, I mean, thank god). Talking to them doesn’t do any good because they have no ideology beyond anger, no goals other than chaos, no visible personalities other than enraged trolls.

SO! Let’s talk about something you can do about this embarrassing blight on gaming! Gamergate is, according to them, about ethics in journalism and the “unfair” coverage that indie games get. You buy (or even play for free) two indie games that get mentioned a lot by gamergaters:

  • Depression Quest, developed by Zoe Quinn, the woman whose ex started it all. Whether or not you can afford to pay, playing the game is a great way to show support for alternative games.
  • Gone Home, a critical darling that gamergate likes to use as an example of “unfair” indie game coverage. (There was, unsurprisingly, little to no backlash of other indie games, like Papers, Please — which is great and you should get that, too.) A game about teenage lesbians who aren’t sexually objectified goes over about as well as you would expect with the gamergate crowd.

Also, you can continue to contribute Feminist Frequency if you like Anita Sarkeesian’s critical look at women in video games.

I get a lot of new followers every time I post about gamergate, so let’s put that to good use. Gamergate is all about negativity, and it can be hard to counter that. Support their targets like Zoe Quinn and Anita Sarkeesian with positive actions.

the-exercist:

Reclaiming Fitspo: Brenda Villa

Villa is an American water polo player. Standing at 5’4” and 174 pounds, she is the shortest member of the US women’s polo team.

Born in Los Angeles, she is the daughter of Mexican immigrants. She first joined a water polo team at 8 years old, following in the footsteps of her older brother. However, since her high school did not have a girls’ team, she spent those four years on the boys’ water polo team instead. This helped her to establish a competitive attitude that contributed to her becoming a 4-time 1st team All-League member, 4-time 1st team All-C.I.F. and a 4-time All-American. She was even invited onto the Junior Olympic Team when she was 16.

While Villa attended Stanford University, she played three seasons on their polo team. In her freshman year alone (2001), she scored 69 goals and was named the NCAA Women’s Water Polo Player of the Year. In 2002 she led her team with 60 goals to win the NCAA Women’s Water Polo Championship. She was then awarded the 2002 Peter J. Cutino Award as the top female college water polo player in the United States. She graduated in 2003 with a degree in political science.

Villa joined Team USA in 1998. This means that she has participated in four Olympic Games (earning one Bronze medal, two Silver and one Gold), often scoring the most goals per game for her team. She was even made team captain of the 2005 US national team, winning a silver medal at the FINA World Championship in Montreal. When considering multiple World Championships, Pan American Games and World Cups, Villa is officially the world’s most decorated athlete in women’s water polo. 

Click here to see all #Reclaiming-Fitspo profiles.

(via glittervillain)